535 E. Montgomery Street, Suite B. Villa Rica, GA 30180
CONTACT US TODAY 678-840-8072
TRANSPORT SERVICE Offered across W. Georgia
FINANCIAL HELP Is available to some
ONE GOAL Prevent unwanted litters

It's time to give your pet a chance at a healthy, happy life.

A Healthy Choice

Spaying or neutering your pet gives them the chance to live longer. It eliminates the development completely of testicular or ovarian cancer that becomes prevalent in animals that have not had the procedure.

Convenient Location

The clinic is available to everyone and is conveniently located off I-20 in Villa Rica.We focus strictly on spay/neuter surgeries, if needed, will administer rabies and other shots during the time of the procedure.

Services Rendered

During your pet's procedure, they will also receive the following at no extra charge: Brief vet exam, sedation and pain medicine, general anesthesia, tummy tattoo, and of course, lot's of tender love and care.

Facts To Fix


Is your dog or cat unfixed? Please contact us today to book an appoitnment for a safe spay / neuter procedure. Give your pet a healthy life.
What We Do
West Georgia Spay/Neuter Clinic's mission is to provide a non-lethal solution to the homeless, abandoned, and feral animal populations so that euthanasia is no longer an acceptable means of population control. The purpose of the clinic is to attack pet overpopulation of companion animals by focusing on the root of the problem there are too many animals having unwanted litters.
When We Started
In the Spring of 2005 Carroll County Humane Society board retreat, the Board of Directors decided that the next important goal of the organization was to start a spay/neuter clinic. On April 4, 2006, CCHS was accepted into the Humane Alliance NSNRT program and started working on the clinic project.
Our Belief For the Future
The animal shelters in the West Georgia area are overwhelmed with unwanted animals, and consequently have heart-breakingly high euthanization rates. The purpose of the clinic is to attack pet overpopulation of companion animals by focusing on the root of the problem—there are too many animals having unwanted litters, which then do not find homes and end up at the shelter, where they either risk the chances of encountering diseases and dying or being euthanized, or are allowed to wander the streets having litters of their own which continue to contribute to the problem.